Singles Club #34

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The XX and buzz bands aplenty make up the singles round up, but it’s little-known Elizabeth Darling who’s really giving Terry Owen the sweats.


Henry Rollins Don’t Dance: Hello Darlin’Single of the Week
In these often tiring times of predictable four chord 4/4 saturation, it’s always nice when someone with a ukulele and flute comes along to upset the applecart.
The creation of Aussie native Elizabeth Darling, this cheerful little skip across the fopish fields of summer is a breath of fresh air compared to some of the turgid balls that passes for credible music at the minute.
If Elizabeth as a person is as alluring as her soft, longing voice then i’m guessing she’s like a slightly drunk Britney in a full Everton replica kit.
Oh, and if you wait for the last 30 seconds you’ll receive an unexpected but pleasing surprise.

Henry Rollins Don’t Dance: Hello Darlin’ – live at the Duke of Uke, London.
Skeletons and The Empty Pockets: Oh Brother, Oh Sister!
There simply aren’t enough ‘woo woos’ in music today, not since Supergrass in their heyday anyway.
Once the initial fear that they could be the bastard slag child of The Darkness has been eradicated, the Sheffield quintet deliver a compelling case for fandom. They list Slayer, Michael Jackson and martial arts among their interests.
So if you happen to meet someone moonwalking wearing an inverted cross while sagely advising people to ‘be water my friend’ there’s a good chance it could be one of the SATEP lads. A promosing debut.

Skeletons and The Empty Pockets: Oh Brother, Oh Sister!
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros: Desert Song
In the finest tradition of the whacked out 70s concept album, Desert Song forms the first part of a 12-part feature length movie musical, which is based around the middle name Edward’s dad wrote on his birth certificate.
Apparently, whatever that name is, it translates into ‘Devil’ while the film which accompanies the album features his dad chanting stuff in Monument Valley – footage shot by his mum. Modern parenting at its best.
But musically wise, while a bit cheesy in parts, it may be worth more than just a glance. They sound a bit like Fifth Dimension, which can be nothing but good.

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros: Desert Song
The XX: Basic Space
Ideal for a major chillaxing session, it probably isn’t possible to get any mellower than this.
Almost other wordly and whispery throughout, you get the feeling The XX have a big secret which they might not be ready to reveal just yet.

The XX: Basic Space
Doves: Winterhill
That repetitive intro, have I heard it somewhere before? Pretty sure I have somewhere. Anyhoo, while Mark Hughes may struggle with the concept, it’s possible that not everythinng from Manchester turns to detestable shit when there’s money to be made.
One imagines Doves have plenty of the stuff yet their down to earthness remains one of their many strong facets.
While Winter Hill doesn’t tread any new territory, there’s plenty there to suggest that this track, a heartfelt tribute to that massive hill in the west Pennines with the television mast sticking out of it, will have its admirers.

Doves: Winterhill
Killa Kela: Built Like an Amplifier
Dubbed the world’s best beat boxer, it’s probable that his talents would be best served on the stage, as his talent doesn’t truly shine through on record.
But if you like value for money, you get five different versions of the song on the CD single.

Killa Kela: Built Like an Amplifier
CoCoELectrik: Shine a Light
Could so easily have been a Kate Bush B-side from 1983. Frustratingly, it could also have been a damn sight better.
The main ingredients are all waiting to be thrown into the blender but instead, some bulb has just given it a light whipping with a tea spoon instead. Still, it’s a rather good if incomplete sounding synth pop effort.

CoCoELectrik: Shine a Light
The Twilight Sad: I Became a Prostitute
With a title like that, you’d half expect Jeremy Kyle to be offering sympathetic backing vocals whilst shedding a crocodile tear or two.
Described as part of a new breed of ‘British Noise’ there doesn’t really seem to be much substance to this except exactly that – noise.
(Strongly, strongly disagree – Singles Ed)

The Twilight Sad: I Became a Prostitute
The Blizzards: Buy It, Sell It
More celebrity vocals, this time from the mahogony man of mystique and antiques David Dickinson. Well, no. Obviously.
But if this track gets played enough in the right places, it could easily make an impact. In rather twee fashion, they have been described as Weezer on steroids. Although exactly what a grunge band on bodily enhancing drugs sound like is anyone’s guess.
There’s a touch of prog in there somewhere with a hint of aztec camera somewhere else. Worth keeping a check on.

The Blizzards: Buy It, Sell It

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