Unknown Pleasures #143 ft. Exposed Brick, The Black Delta Movement, KUDZU

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The Black Delta Movement

The Black Delta Movement

With less than two weeks into the New Year Getintothis’ Mike Stanton is back with a fresh batch of new music for us.

2018 is young, still only learning to walk and we already have a trio new tunes for you with some 80’s infused synthpop from Spain, garage psychedelia from Kingston Upon Hull and post-punk synth wave from Missouri

Scouse Spain-based synth protagonist Exposed Brick has managed to capture that early 1980’s cold, new wave, sci-fi synthpop sound of Depeche Mode or Human League and has woven a melodic and catchy four minute pop song. Harsh electronic beats and glacier-cold synths wash over the detached and slightly low-in-the-mix vocals singing about isolation and alienation, all good fodder for the late 70’s and early 80’s new wave pioneers.

The main man behind all this remains something of a mystery but it is clear where he is drawing his inspiration from and is firmly embedding himself in the burgeoning electronic scene in Spain. Clever use of textured synthesizers and mannered vocal pushes Pain (Reflections) in a pop direction while retaining the austere tone of early synthesizer groups such as Kraftwerk.

The self-conscious detachment enhances the postmodern sense of emotional isolation, obsession with form over content and love of modernity. Pain (Reflection) has a very real and raw emotional honesty which elevates it beyond mere robotic post-punk.

Exposed Brick is definitely one to watch throughout 2018.

The Black Delta Movement are from Kingston-Upon-Hull and are a band that pack a mighty punch with a heady mix of garage rock and psychedelia. Formed in 2010 by Matt Burr and Dom Abbott and with heavy rhythm and a crushing beat, The Black Delta Movement’s swathes of sound and texture wash over you creating a vibrant soundscape that takes you right back to early Stooges, MC5 and Sonics.

Live they are intense, pummelling the crowd with a plated gown of volume, depth and incessant groove. Drawing inspiration from both contemporary artists and those of yesteryear, King Mosquito, their latest release,  confidently evokes the sounds of The Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Black Angels and The Small Faces. It’s abrasive, raucous and rattles you down to your bones.

2018 will welcome the bands first album, Preservation recorded in London with Little Barrie
collaborator Mike Burnham. This is sure to be an exciting year for the band as they push their sound into new territories. Live dates are sure to follow and they are an outfit not to be missed.

More sounds from the other side? Get onto our Unknown Pleasures archive here

KUDZU (Credit: Artists Facebook page)

KUDZU (Credit: Artists Facebook page)

Based in Springfield, Missouri, Kudzu consist of Seth Goodwin (vocals, synth, and drum programming) and Mark Gillenwaters (vocals and guitar). Influenced by bands such as Tears For Fears, The Cure, Spectrum, Guided by Voices and Sympathy, they’ve managed to create their own unique sound.

Their forthcoming album Defeated, slated for release in early 2018 via Push & Pull Records, delivers a cheerfully caustic synth pop assault with psychedelic underpinnings, like paint fumes you’d happily dance to. The offerings range from post-punk (Defeated) to synth pop (One Purpose, No Backbone) and tracks with a darker more industrial sense (Balking The Grave). Their vocal delivery oscillates between John Lydon of Sex Pistols and PiL fame and the cold sinister lyricism of Al Jourgensen‘s early-days Ministry.

“A lot of these songs come from a place of disenchantment with punk “DIY” scenes I’ve dedicated too much time to and the resulting dissociation as I’ve continued to have involvement in those scenes,” says Seth Goodwin. “A documentation of a transitional period that I’m sure a lot of people feel as they start to feel parts of them age out from this type of lifestyle but don’t know how to do anything else.”

Defeated will be released on cassette and digitally via Push & Pull Records.

 

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