Deep Cuts third birthday featuring MATTERS, Aimee Steven, Roswell Project, STONE and Florrie Guitar Orchestra: Phase One, Liverpool

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The Roswell Project

Deep Cuts celebrated its third birthday at the weekend, Getintothis’ Cai Thomas on a memorable night of new music in Liverpool.

Happy Birthday, Deep Cuts!

Getintothis’ monthly gig night turned three on Friday. With the pizza and beer from American Pizza Slice having gone down a treat, there was a real buzz in the air as night fell in Liverpool ahead of what was always going to be a great night.

Even amidst the occasional hailstorm and drizzle of rain, kicking up a fuss outside, the excitement in the room was evident, but there were a few looks of confusion at the number of benches in front of the stage. You would be mistaken to think you had wandered into a school assembly hall.

To start the evening, we saw something truly special, The Florrie Guitar Orchestra – born out of a community workshop, organised for an array of different and diverse people. It provides a service by helping many learn an instrument and take part in large ensembles, to help develop skills together.

Though more importantly, it acts as a way of letting people socialise with each-other and helps make new friends and connections.

Following their slot at Sound City they’ve garnered interest from venues all over the North West, it really lifted the mood of everyone in the room. With their renditions of; Ticket to Ride, Stand by Me and sound-tracking the opening greetings with a chilled cover of Harvest Moon. Great act and an amazing organisation.

With the screech of the feedback coming out of the amplifiers, on comes STONE, a post-punk sounding band that draws comparisons to the early work of Oasis. Yet with frontman, Finlay Power, is a singer fashioned in the model of a Mod or Skinhead. Screaming vocals are contrasted by moments of softness, with a sound in the area of Van McCann.

Following the rebrand from being known as The Bohos, they’ve gone on to support both Black Grape and Cast at the Mountford Hall. Now with a number of big-name artists support slots, under their belts, it will be only a matter of time before they start getting some big interest. Keep an eye on these.

The rise of Aimée Steven has not gone unnoticed by us and following her sets at; Kendal Calling, Sound City, Deeper Cuts and LIMF. It will be interesting to see where she goes from here.

She mixes a classic rock arrangement, complimented by soft melodies and suggestive lyrics. It is relaxing to listen to, and it was great to see a range of ages, equally men and women, enjoying such a great performance. Better off Dead, have a listen, you won’t be disappointed.

Acting as a great break-up to the night, MATTERS, an experimental acoustic-driven type of dance music provides something really different.

Whilst lit up by a constant stream of blue and red glow, they create a refuge that pays homage to the dance music scene of the 90s and noughties. It may not be something everyone could listen to sober, but the Tomorrow Never Knows inspired drumbeats, keeps you hooked.

The recent release of Hannah has only helped to project the Digbeth formed electronica band. This being their first Liverpool show, it was an excellent debut effort, it will be interesting to see if they gather a following in the city.

Closing off the night, we have The Roswell Project, previously known as The Gear; who produce a Humbug-era, Catfish & The Bottlemen influenced type of sound. It’s intense and heavily lyric-based, in resemblance of the early Arctic Monkeys’ work, and having played the first Deep Cuts at Phase One in August 2018, it was a welcomed return.

They’re indicative of the bravado of the North West, with truthful songs by ‘working-class’ lads. Boss band.

As the last remnants of the audience either scatter or break into small groups, discussing the events of the night, the consensus seemed to be that it was a great celebration of such a well-known gig-event.

We will see you again next month!

Images by Getintothis’ Kevin Barrett

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